With craftsman’s spirit, A&C always tries to do better.

Toggle Navigation

Why are buffers called chemical sponges? - Answers

The popular example is the carbonate buffer that maintains the level of our blood pH at 7.4. Why are buffers called chemical sponges? Asked By Wiki User. Unanswered Questions.

Get Price

Sponge - Wikipedia

Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera (/ p ə ˈ r ɪ f ər ə /; meaning "pore bearer"), are a basal Metazoa (animal) clade as a sister of the Diploblasts. They are multicellular organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells.The branch of zoology that studies

Get Price

Sponge - Regeneration | Britannica

Sponge - Sponge - Regeneration: The extraordinary capacity of sponges to regenerate is manifested not only by restoration of damaged or lost parts but also by complete regeneration of an adult from fragments or even single cells. Sponge cells may be separated by mechanical methods (e.g., squeezing a piece of sponge through fine silk cloth) or by chemical methods (e.g., elimination of calcium

Get Price

Buffer Systems Flashcards | Quizlet

Function of Buffer Systems. to react with strong acids or bases in the body and replace them with weak acids or bases that can change the normal pH values only slightly. Buffers. Chemicals that replace strong acids or bases with weak ones - Found in all body fluids - Also referred to as chemical sponges.

Get Price

Sponges - EnchantedLearning

Sponges obtain nourishment and oxygen from this flowing water. The flowing water also carries out waste products. Anatomy: The body of a sponge has two outer layers separated by an acellular (having no cells) gel layer called the mesohyl (also called the mesenchyme). In the gel layer are either spicules (supportive needles made of calcium

Get Price

Buffer | chemistry | Britannica

Buffer, in chemistry, solution usually containing an acid and a base, or a salt, that tends to maintain a constant hydrogen ion concentration. Ions are atoms or molecules that have lost or gained one or more electrons. An example of a common buffer is a solution of acetic acid (CH3COOH) and sodium

Get Price

Chem 1010 - Quiz 14 Flashcards | Quizlet

-Chemotherapy is more effective the longer the chemical treatment. A drug that alters our tolerance to pain but does not decrease the electrical signals to the brain is called a(n) _____. analgesic. At one time, halothane which is a chlorocarbon, CCHBrCl, was widely used as a general anesthetic. Suggest why its use is now banned.

Get Price

Phylum Porifera: Skeleton of Sponges, Spongin fibers and

If the elongated ray bears a disc at both ends, it is called as amphidisc. Triaxon: These spicules have three axes that cross one another at right angles to produce six rays. Thus it is also called hexactinal spicule. These triaxon spicules are characteristic of glass sponges of the class Hexactanellida.

Get Price

Phylum Porifera: Skeleton of Sponges, Spongin fibers and

If the elongated ray bears a disc at both ends, it is called as amphidisc. Triaxon: These spicules have three axes that cross one another at right angles to produce six rays. Thus it is also called hexactinal spicule. These triaxon spicules are characteristic of glass sponges of the class Hexactanellida.

Get Price

Poriferans - biology-questions-and-answers

Sponges contain an outer wall covered by flat cells called pinacocytes as well as pores surrounded by special cells called porocytes. Their internal wall is filled with choanocytes, flagellate cells specialized in the phagocytosis of food brought to the central cavity. The choanocyte flagella also maintain the water flow inside the sponge.

Get Price

Reproduction In Sponges | Zoology for IAS, IFoS and other

An osculum is formed later. Development in asconoid and leuconoid sponges In asconoid and leuconoid sponges, the blastula is called coeloblastula as it does not possess a mouth but has a blastocoel and flagella on the surface of the body. This larva escapes from the sponge body and swims about freely in

Get Price

Buffer | chemistry | Britannica

Buffer, in chemistry, solution usually containing an acid and a base, or a salt, that tends to maintain a constant hydrogen ion concentration. Ions are atoms or molecules that have lost or gained one or more electrons. An example of a common buffer is a solution of acetic acid (CH3COOH) and sodium

Get Price

Reproduction In Sponges | Zoology for IAS, IFoS and other

An osculum is formed later. Development in asconoid and leuconoid sponges In asconoid and leuconoid sponges, the blastula is called coeloblastula as it does not possess a mouth but has a blastocoel and flagella on the surface of the body. This larva escapes from the sponge body and swims about freely in

4
Get Price

What Is the Importance of Buffers in Pharmacy? | Healthfully

This is commonly called a buffered isotonic solution. Both buffered solutions and isotonic solutions are also referred to as adjusted solutions. The primary purpose and importance of buffers in pharmacy is to protect pharmaceutical preparations from any sudden change in pH even when limited concentrations of acid or base are added.

Get Price

Why is blood a good buffer solution? - Quora

4/9/2018· The bicarbonate buffer system. It's been some years since i studied this, but it goes a little something like this: This chemical equation can buffer changes in pH by "going right or left" depending on the need. If there is a high amount of H+ i

Get Price

Poriferans - biology-questions-and-answers

Sponges contain an outer wall covered by flat cells called pinacocytes as well as pores surrounded by special cells called porocytes. Their internal wall is filled with choanocytes, flagellate cells specialized in the phagocytosis of food brought to the central cavity. The choanocyte flagella also maintain the water flow inside the sponge.

Get Price

Why is water a good negative control for chemical tests

1/30/2018· Water is commonly used as a negative control in chemical tests, especially distilled water. The distilled water is devoid of any minerals or salts, unlike regular water (or tap water) and hence is

Get Price

Buffer Definition - Chemistry and Biology

5/4/2019· A buffer is a solution containing either a weak acid and its salt or a weak base and its salt, which is resistant to changes in pH. In other words, a buffer is an aqueous solution of either a weak acid and its conjugate base or a weak base and its conjugate acid. A buffer may also be called a pH buffer, hydrogen ion buffer, or buffer solution.

Get Price

Are glass sponges made of glass? : Ocean Exploration Facts

Glass sponges, or hexactinellids, belong to the phylum Porifera. These animals are common only in the deep ocean. Their tissues contain glass-like structural particles made of silica. The many tiny siliceous elements of a glass sponge's skeleton are called "spicules." Unlike most sponges

Get Price

Porifera: Phylum Of The Almost Indestructible Sponges

The body of a sponge is a collection of a few different types of cells, loosely arranged in a gelatinous matrix called a mesohyl, mesoglea or mesenchyme. This mesohyl is the connective tissue of a sponge body and it is supported by the skeletal elements. The skeletal elements of sponges are variable and important in taxonomy.

Get Price

Buffer Effectiveness | Boundless Chemistry

Therefore, the pH for the buffer with an acid/base concentration of 0.7/0.6M after the addition of HCl is 4.68. Finally, we repeat the calculation for the buffer with 7/6 mM after the addition of HCl. We know from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation that the ratio of the concentration of the buffer determines the pH rather than the concentration.

4
Get Price

Porifera - The Biology of Sponges - Adidarwinian

Porifera is a phylum comprising of the multi-cellular invertebrate animals called Sponges. The term "Porifera" literally means " Pore Bearers ". The animals of this phylum have tiny pores in their body walls, and this characteristic feature is the basis of the name of this phylum.

Get Price

pH and Buffers

In solutions, a chemical buffer acts similarly. For example, carbonic acid (H 2 CO 3 ) is a weak acid. When it is put into solution, a small amount of carbonic acid dissociates into H + ions and the remaining bicarbonate anion (HCO 3 - ).

Get Price

pH and Buffers

In solutions, a chemical buffer acts similarly. For example, carbonic acid (H 2 CO 3 ) is a weak acid. When it is put into solution, a small amount of carbonic acid dissociates into H + ions and the remaining bicarbonate anion (HCO 3 - ).

Get Price